An Evaluation of the Presence of Heavy Metals in the Poultry Feeds Marketed in Ijebu Jesa, Osun State

Francis Olusegun Oladeji *

Department of Environmental Health Science, Fountain University, Osogbo, Osun-State, Nigeria.

Adepoju Adelola

Department of Environmental Health Science, Fountain University, Osogbo, Osun-State, Nigeria.

Tawakalitu T. Abolayo

Department of Environmental Health Science, Fountain University, Osogbo, Osun-State, Nigeria.

Oluwaseun Awodele

Department of Environmental Health Science, Fountain University, Osogbo, Osun-State, Nigeria.

Ojedeji Kolawole Ayodeji

Department of Environmental Health Science, Fountain University, Osogbo, Osun-State, Nigeria.

Olanrewaju John Adedayo

Department of Environmental Health Science, Faculty of Basic Medical and Health Science, Lead City University, Ibadan, Oyo-State, Nigeria.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

One of the most crucial areas of agriculture is poultry production, with commercial layers and broilers making a significant contribution to supplying the rising need for protein from the growing population through eggs and meats. It's crucial that hens have enough of certain necessary metals like copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and manganese (Mn) in their meals. We examined the levels of cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), chromium (Cr), and zinc (Zn) in four brands of two commercial feeds (Animal care and Top feeds) that are often used by chicken farmers in Osun state. The meals were bought at Ijebu-Jesa, Osun State, from several retail establishments. Atomic Absorption Spectrometer (AAS) analysis was done after the feeds had been ashed, digested, and examined for metal contamination. The concentration of the key components was consistently lowest in starting feed. The feed had relatively little of the necessary components (copper, zinc, iron, and manganese). Because of this, the projected nutritional values of the feed based on the concentrations of the necessary components were extremely low. This demonstrates that supplements were not provided to the diets as was reasonable to expect. The feed samples, however, had very high levels of lead. Anthropogenic sources of lead contamination in the environment, particularly fossil fuels, may be to blame for this. Adoption of alternative renewable energy sources like biodiesel and bioethanol is highly necessary.

Keywords: Poultry, grower, heavy metals, chicken feeds, contamination


How to Cite

Oladeji, F. O., Adelola, A., Abolayo, T. T., Awodele, O., Ayodeji, O. K., & Adedayo, O. J. (2023). An Evaluation of the Presence of Heavy Metals in the Poultry Feeds Marketed in Ijebu Jesa, Osun State. Asian Journal of Chemical Sciences, 13(5), 71–77. https://doi.org/10.9734/ajocs/2023/v13i5254

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